Meet Illustrator Carl Wiens

A versatile artist with lots of clever and curious ideas, gives us a glimpse into the world of his art.  Introducing illustrator, Carl Wiens, represented by i2i Art.

This self-portrait titled, Work and Play, is a tribute to the life of an illustrator – chasing deadlines and relaxing with a pint at the end of the day. Image created for a group show at the Land Gallery in Portland.

This self-portrait titled, Work and Play, is a tribute to the life of an illustrator – chasing deadlines and relaxing with a pint at the end of the day. Image created for a group show at the Land Gallery in Portland.

i2i Art: How long have you been illustrating for a living?

Carl Wiens: I’ve been drawing pictures for as long as I can remember. I started illustrating full time 26 years ago. That sounds like a long time, but my work has evolved an grown over the years. Even after all this time I am always looking for new directions and sources of inspiration.

This signature piece is titled, The Dragonfly Effect: How to use social media for social good. Cover image for the Stanford Social Innovation Review.

This signature piece is titled, The Dragonfly Effect: How to use social media for social good. Cover image for the Stanford Social Innovation Review.

i2i Art: Describe a dream assignment?

Carl Wiens: It’s hard to pick a favourite; I work on so many different projects. I like to get involved with a series of images or dive into a book project.

A couple of years ago, I was contacted by publisher Brian Kaufman, and offered the chance to illustrate an entire issue of a magazine, cover-to-cover. SubTerrain is a Canadian arts and literary review, offering short stories, poetry and art. Its tagline is ‘Strong Words for a Polite Nation’. I haven’t had the chance to work illustrate fiction and poetry very often. I reviewed the articles, scribbling down the images springing to mind. I wanted to create strong images to go with the words.

Working on this project was like a night at a gourmet restaurant. One tasty dish after another, each with a different flavour. The work I did for the magazine was recognized by The Society of Illustrators and published in their annual, Luerzer’s 200 Best Illustrators and won a gold medal from the Western Canadian Magazine Awards. Here’s my favourite piece, for a short story by Lee Kvern called ‘Detachment’.

i2i Art: What would be an illustration assignment that you’d love to land?

Carl Wiens: I would love to work on a book project, illustrating a novel or developing visuals of characters and settings for a fictional novel. I have done some fantastic cover assignments for Tor.com and worked with writers like John Scalzi, Rudy Rucker and Bruce Sterling. If I could find the right vehicle, I would love to see my Mecanismos characters developed into a book, animation or app.

Loco – Cover image for a Science Fiction short story, involving organic memory storage, scientists and exploding heads – for Tor.com

Loco – Cover image for a Science Fiction short story, involving organic memory storage, scientists and exploding heads – for Tor.com

i2i Art: What personal interests have most affected the direction you’ve taken with your art?
Carl Wiens: When I started out in the business, I was interested in whimsical illustrations and cartoons. My work matured as I moved through my career, and I was able to add more depth and conceptual strength, expanding into serious subject matter and op-ed illustrations. At a certain point I returned to the subjects that have inspired me throughout my life and decided to focus on nature, science and collage. I alsogot back to producing prints and creating art for gallery shows. That focus has driven my work to new levels and allowed me to establish new assignment work along with greater creative satisfaction.

I like the idea of an eccentric scientist, creating experiments in the lab, as a model for my creations. I think that sense of curiosity and playfulness still informs what I do.

Title: Wavelength – Illustration for NPR calendar – these are the little beings that live inside your radio.

Title: Wavelength – Illustration for NPR calendar – these are the little beings that live inside your radio.

i2i Art: How do you get started with a creative brief for an assignment?

Carl Wiens: It is critical to sit down with paper and pencil and allow things to flow. Sometimes the act of drawing can bring to mind associations and concepts that lead to a series of visuals that solve a problem or arrive at an image that never would have presented itself. I also have an extensive library of old ephemera, encyclopedias and reference books that I can pour through to get inspired. I collect a lot of obscure manuals, vintage textbooks and other sources of odd and unconventional ideas.

i2i Art: Tell us a bit about your process?

Carl Wiens: I work primarily in Illustrator. I know my work doesn’t necessarily look as though it’s vector-based, but it is how I developed my technique and prefer to work with. Vector illustrations give me the flexibility to edit and experiment with colour and balance. I also like the way that the final illustrations can be scaled up or down without compromising detail and resolution.

I always start with pencil sketches and usually present initial concepts as such. I fill in the details once sketches are approved. I ink the drawings, scan them, then vectorize the linework. I can add in other elements from my large collection of vectorized vintage objects and textures. The mechanical elements in my illustrations come from my archives. I spend a lot of time balancing the elements and getting them to work together as a whole. So yes, the finished pieces are often a hybrid of traditional and digital work. I don’t want the pieces to look to digital, unless I am working on small icons or on a quick-turnaround assignment.

i2i Art: You created this illustration for the Work/Life series published by Uppercase.  Tell us about this image?

I worked in construction and have done a lot of hands-on labour over the years. I bring a workman-like approach to the things i do. It’s important to understand process, and how to build and image, to plan things out and bring all of the elements together to produce the final. I built my last studio in a dusty old barn. I cleaned it out, re-framed the inside, put in the drywall, wiring, windows and trim. When it was finished, I took a lot of pride in what I accomplished It’s important to have a space you feel is your own, where you feel comfortable and can make things happen.

i2i Art: What was the inspiration behind it this image, which you have available as a print?

I love to cycle, so drawing a bicycle and creating a print was a natural fit. I used a pair of old kids’ bikes as a basis for the drawing. I overlapped the images and screen printed them in different colours on a collaged background. There is a faux 3D feeling to the pieces. Remember the feeling of freedom and joy you had as a kid riding a bike? Those memories get fuzzy over time and this piece is meant to evoke that.

i2i Art:  Have you ever worked in animation with your art or had a client animate it?
Carl Wiens: I did some character design for Nelvana when I started out in the business. I also helped to develop and design segments for a show called Freaky Stories. My work lends itself well to motion and it is something that I intend to develop. I recently did a test, with a walking cycle for one of my mechanical collages.

See more of Carl Wiens’ work. Represented by i2i Art. 

Angelica Yiacoupis' Creative Process

Find inspiration. Follow your instinct. Experiment and perfect.  We asked illustrator Angelica Yiacoupis to walk us through her creative process.

i2i Art: Where do you start?

Angelica Yiacoupis: When working with a client, I start with brainstorming words from the brief, which then leads off into numerous spider diagrams. Following this I draw tiny sketches from these words. These turn into little rough thumbnails of jumbled up ideas.

i2i Art: What’s your go-to inspiration?

Angelica Yiacoupis: I ‘google’ of course, and I look through my pinterest collections. Sometimes I find inspiration off websites such as Bored Panda and exhibitions; the ‘Pick me up’ Graphic Art Fair being my personal favourite. Magazines such as Computer Arts are also full of great ideas.

I am also inspired by several artists work such as Leandro Castelao and Mick Marston with his bold use of vector animals. The fascination I have with Leandro Castelao’s work stems from the mechanical inside workings of machines and technology from a young age, which I also incorporate into my own work.

 i2i Art: What’s the next step in your process?

Angelica Yiacoupis: I never normally have the final image completely drawn out before I start on my mac, as I find the idea changes as I’m creating the piece. I don’t take my sketches onto the mac either, instead I draw them out digitally from scratch to create a more structured, symmetrical look that I find is better suited. I experiment a lot with composition and ways of drawing elements of the image in Adobe Illustrator, as well as testing out lots of colour palettes. Most of my creative process is spent on the computer as I’ve always found it easier to jump right in.

My final outcome is always a polished structured piece as I love perfection in my own work.

Let’s take a look!

Coca Cola & the Gods

Angelica Yiacoupis: A completely open self initiated brief. I wanted to create something fresh and out of the ordinary. I started by choosing to advertise Coca Cola because of my strong interest in advertising and the fact that they have such fun and lively existing adverts, they would be a a major dream client for me. I decided to tie in the concept with the idea of Greek mythology. With this unique idea I wanted a unique layout. I came up with the idea of dividing the series of pages into three sections and then showing three ways Coca Cola was being used by each god to tell a story in each piece. And so Coca Cola and the Gods was born.

Zues

Zues

Eros

Eros

Hermes

Hermes

 

Global Warning

Angelica Yiacoupis: This idea started from a drawing I did a few years ago. I decided to create the quirky character and as I did the evolution began. The outdated robot on it’s last legs transformed from the drawing into a much more complex creature. I always like to give my work some sort of meaning, to add a purpose and get a strong message across to an audience. The original piece with the robot bomb bumble bee seemed to fit in very nicely with the idea of self destruction and the effects humans are having on the environment and the world. I then added the landscape and combined with the character, I feel it carries a strong message.  I decided to add to the seriousness of the message of climate change by showing more aspects of climate change such as gas emissions and the effect carbon dioxide is having on animals—by killing them.

 

Watch Angelica at Work

Monika Melnychuk for Owl Magazine

It always pays to be prepared! Owl Magazine, art directed by Jill Monsod, has put together a pretty handy guide to the 'great outdoors' for their Summer issue. i2i Art illustrator Monika Melnychuk knew quite a bit about this topic already, spending much of her leisure time biking through the backwood trails in Whitehorse, Canada.  

And Monika's illustrations give a humorous twist on those all too important survival lessons. Have a quick read and smile along the way as Monika's characters show us a thing or two about those great outdoors.

Monika Melnychuk for Owl Magazine
Monika Melnychuk for Owl Magazine
Monika Melnychuk for Owl Magazine
Monika Melnychuk for Owl Magazine

See more of Monika's endearing characters and illustrations. Monika Melnychuk is represented by i2i Art Inc.

Mark Hoffmann for D Home Magazine

Ever found your kid hanging from a candelabra or climbing a giant holiday decoration?  In his best playful style, Mark Hoffmann illustrated the story Babes in Toyland:  Activities that will make your kids' holiday season more merryfor art director Jamie Laubhan-Oliver, at D Home Magazine. If you like this image, there are a lot more fun Mark Hoffmann illustrations here.

©Mark Hoffmann_MH447_i2iArt
©Mark Hoffmann_MH447_i2iArt

Ian Phillips: The Wiggle in Your Walk Must Go

Chiropractor, Dr. Richard Robinson, approached i2i art to have Ian Phillips illustrate a cover for his new book addressing a phenomenon that he'd observed and treated for years.  Apparently the vast majority of us have a little wiggle when we walk that actually translates into back problems over time.  In his helpful guide he offers suggestions to deal with the wiggle and thus the back.  The question that begs asking is, how many of us are willing to let go of our little swagger? Ian ended up wearing both his designer and illustrator hats as he approached this assignment.  The striking illustration that emerged from his concept and evocative type treatment work beautifully to communicate what the good doctor had in mind.  Don't you just love the illustrative direction this project took Ian in?  There's a bit more realism and retro and together it's fabulous!

Ian writes in his blog:  "This was a fun project, I think I probably drew about fifty pairs of shoes before I got the right look for this! Note the continued stripe pattern in the fabric folds at the knee, the pockets, and repeated on the bottom of the shoe and on her t-shirt. Adds a little playfulness."

To see more of Ian Phillip's illustrations visit his portfolio.

©Ian Phillips_IP1409_i2iArt

Ian Phillips: Banners

Some years back, Ian Phillips created a version of these wonderful editorial headers for a small press magazine.  They were used in the design of the various sections:  Book Review, Letters, Contributors and Editor’s Note.  

Recently I was chatting with Ian about how much I liked these lovely conceptual images and he enthusiastically offered to revisit them in his fresh new style adding text using his new hand created font.  To see more of Ian's updated portfolio please visit here.

 

Voila!  People reviewing books…(chop, chop)

©Ian Phillips_IP1042_i2iArt

Not so friendly letters to the editor…(shall we say fuming?)

Print

Ian says the Contributor's piece was based on the fact that there’s always one bad egg in the bunch. Can you guess who the spoon is? (clue:  it starts with 'E')

©Ian Phillips_IP1040_i2iArt

Ah yes!  And there’s always the editor’s note…quite possibly signed in blood!

©Ian Phillips_IP1041_i2iArt

 

Betsy Everitt for Incognito

  For the 5th year running, Betsy Everitt participated in the annual Santa Monica Museum of Art’s 10th annual Exhibition and Benefit Art Sale, 'Incognito'.  'The Art World Up For Grabs' get's it's name, INCOGNITO because all works are signed on the back--the artists’ identities revealed only after purchase!  Betsy says, "It is a very special and super fun community event (complete with celebrity sightings!) which helps to fund the museum's free exhibitions.  My submissions have sold every year, including this one!"  To see more of Betsy's wonderfully delightful illustrations please take a peek at her updated portfolio here.

Happy Day by Betsy Everitt

i2i art welcomes illustrator and surface designer Katy Dockrill

  i2i art is proud to welcome Katy Dockrill into our family of artists.  Her work is fresh and fun and full of irresistible personality!

Below is a small sample of her illustration and surface designs.  To see more please visit Katy's new i2i art portfolio here.

Friends_©KatyDockrill_i2iart
Friends_©KatyDockrill_i2iart

This image (above) called Friends, caught my eye when I first saw it screen printed on a tote bag!

Cover_Up_©KatyDockrill_i2iart
Cover_Up_©KatyDockrill_i2iart

Love the retro car in this illustration!

FamilyPhotos_©KatyDockrill_i2iart
FamilyPhotos_©KatyDockrill_i2iart
animalbooks_©KatyDockrill_i2iart
animalbooks_©KatyDockrill_i2iart

This is one of her lovely surface design patterns.  Can you just imagine it on children's bedding or curtains?

Philippe Béha for VIV Magazine

Philippe Béha illustrates 5 Bogus Reasons Why You Can't Lose Weight. Working with VIV's art director, Vickie Vidana Ellman, Philippe injected a healthy dose of whimsy and humor into his depiction of the mythical excuses women make as to why they are unable to lose those extra pounds after age 40.

5 Bogus Reasons (pg1) ©Philippe Béha/i2iart
5 Bogus Reasons (pg1) ©Philippe Béha/i2iart
5 Bogus Reasons (pg2) ©Philippe Béha/i2iart
5 Bogus Reasons (pg2) ©Philippe Béha/i2iart
5 Bogus Reasons (pg3) ©Philippe Béha/i2iart
5 Bogus Reasons (pg3) ©Philippe Béha/i2iart
5 Bogus Reasons (pg4) ©Philippe Béha/i2iart
5 Bogus Reasons (pg4) ©Philippe Béha/i2iart
5 Bogus Reasons (pg5) ©Philippe Béha/i2iart
5 Bogus Reasons (pg5) ©Philippe Béha/i2iart
5 Bogus Reasons (pg6) ©Philippe Béha/i2iart
5 Bogus Reasons (pg6) ©Philippe Béha/i2iart

Happy Howlidays from Monika Melnychuk!

  After illustrating the Dogbook app, Monika Melnychuk was asked by Geoffrey Roche, of Poolhouse Enterprises, to dress up the dogs for the 'howlidays'!  Monika had tons of fun doing the illustrations (cards designed by Poolhouse).  To check out the poodle sporting a string of holiday bling to the mischievous gift ripping duo, and the adorable Chiuaua aka"Rudolph's brother from another mother", click here to get to visit the Dogbook Facebook page (and while you're there go ahead and send a free e-card to your favorite 'pet'!).

Dogbook Holiday Card illustrations ©Monika Melnychuk/i2iart
Dogbook Holiday Card illustrations ©Monika Melnychuk/i2iart

Rémy Simard's latest Graphic Novel: Horrendo's Curse

  Sneak peek:  Rémy Simard, working with editor, Alison Kooistra, has brought Anna Fienberg's words to life in Annick Press' latest Graphic Novel, Horrendo's Curse.  Horrendo and his young friends enter into the dangerous world of swashbuckling pirates, where they are captured and worked to the bone.  In the meantime, they are even busier as they conjure up their cunning escape plan!  We're sure you'd love to find out what happens next, but I'm afraid you're just going to have to wait until the fall of 2013 when Horrendo's Curse hits bookstores!  More to come...

Horrendo's Curse cover art ©Rémy simard/i2iart
Horrendo's Curse cover art ©Rémy simard/i2iart
'Horrendo's Curse' art ©Rémy simard/i2iart
'Horrendo's Curse' art ©Rémy simard/i2iart

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Alanna Cavanagh: Another Hudson's Bay Exclusive

  Alanna's limited edition Spring '12 tea towel was such a run-away success that The Bay commissioned her to create another design for their Holiday '12 Season.  The beautiful 100% linen tea towels are produced by Ulster Weavers, who have the Royal Warrant to Queen Elizabeth II for Kitchen Textiles.  By the way, they look stunning framed, (if you can't bring yourself to get yours dirty)!

The Bay, in their press material says:  "A talented Canadian illustrator and printmaker, Cavanagh’s witty and playful point of view has caught the eye of magazines like Canadian House & Home and Style at Home, and influential online sources, such as Remodelista and Apartment Therapy."  We think "witty and playful" says it all!

To see more of the Bay's exciting Holiday and Signature Collections, and to meet the fabulous visionary behind all this juicy stuff, Arren Williams, Creative Director of Home Fashions, check out this great post on Design Maze.

If you want to get your limited edition tea towel now, you can make your purchase without having to go any further right here.

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